Anonymous asked: Heascanon on why the Stilinskis dont want to share their first names.

itslookinggrimm:

"Names have power, mój drogi,” Grandma Stilinski said, leaning over Stiles with her great spectacles magnifying her eyes. She scared him a little. “You must never tell anyone your real name because then they will have the power to control you.”

Stiles stared up at her with eyes almost as big as hers. “Not even Scott?”

"That’s his best friend," Claudia said indulgently. 

"Not even Scott," Grandma Stilinski said severely. "You know your papa’s name?"

Stiles looked over at his father, who rolled his eyes. “He’s Dad.”

Grandma Stilinski slapped her knee. “See? I taught him well.”

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fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?
Allow me to answer that for you:
A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
"a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
"a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
"rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)

A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
"Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
"An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
"Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
"Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
"Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
"Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
"Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)
Does that about answer it?

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?

Allow me to answer that for you:

  • A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
    • "a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
    • "a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
    • "rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)
  • A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
  • Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
  • "Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
  • "An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
  • "Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
  • "Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
  • "Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
  • "Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
  • "Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)

Does that about answer it?

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(Source: sisterofthewolves)

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tagged as → #animals #birds #coyotte
Anonymous asked: ok so like what if derek was a teen jeopardy champion. huh? HUH?!

halffizzbin:

swingsetindecember:

halffizzbin:

Anon I really dig your aggressive certainty about this because yes. YES.

Never has any suggestion more elegantly reconciled my own cherished headcanon of Teen Derek: ULTRA-NERD with the show’s actual representation of Teen Derek: POSTURING DOUCHEBAG. It is all coming together!!! DEREK HALE, DOUCHENERD.

Using his wolf senses to beat everyone else who might know the answer to the buzzer!

Giving off serious NERD ATTITUDE in his slacks and baby-blue polo shirt!

Buzzing in after another contestant answers wrong and being like WHAT ARE ‘BERSERKERS’ with such concentrated sass that the whole audience can hear the implied IDIOT at the end!!

Cockily flirting with the pretty student from Colorado at the next podium but getting scared and making an excuse when she immediately proposes that they hook up in the green room!!!

stiles and scott finding it on youtube

I MEAN

OBVIOUSLY.

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brightstrangethings:

photo by Ninevet Photography

brightstrangethings:

photo by Ninevet Photography

(Source: bezkarnie-cytrynowe)

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tagged as → #ANGER #HORSE #ANGEEEEEER
Questions you need to answer when creating a mythology for your world

brightstrangethings:

the-right-writing:

  • How was the world or universe created?
  • What happens to sentient beings before they are born?
  • What happens to sentient beings after they die?
  • If somebody wants help, are there unnatural ways they can get it?
  • If somebody wants power, are there unnatural ways they can get it?
  • What are the goals of the unnatural forces/gods/magical beings?
  • Has death ever been reversed? Can it currently be reversed?
  • Are some sentient beings more favored than others? Why?
  • How many gods/unnatural forces/magical beings are there?
  • How is the world/universe going to end?

This is a great list of world building questions to start with. Answering those first three questions — or variations on them — are a great way to build a foundation of the various belief systems and cultural identities of your world, too. Since your characters typically won’t know things like how the universe was created or what happens after they die, they’ll probably have some pretty complex and ancient cultural or religious answers to those questions, and they might accept or reject the teachings of their native culture or religion on the matter.

As far as all the questions about magic and the supernatural, here are a few more:

  • What are the limitations of the magic or superpower you’re portraying?
  • What are the costs of its use?
  • How can those powers be abused, how can they be used to help people, how can they be monetized, and how do they figure in to people’s cultural and religious ideas?
  • How do people who do not have magic/superpowers react to the presence of those who do? Are they feared, thought of as other, worshiped as gods?
  • How do those who do have magic/superpowers treat those who don’t?

The podcast Writing Excuses has a few great episodes on these subjects that I’d like to point to as resources, as well; you can find all of their podcasts tagged with “World Building” right here, but I’d also like to particularly point to episode 14, "Magic Systems and Their Rules," which has some fantastic discussion of why magic systems need clearly defined rules and how that helps your story.

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theavc:

Why are the Game Of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny?



The Daenerys Targaryen who falls in love with a man who granted her respect when no one else would is different from the Daenerys Targaryen who fell in love with her rapist.

theavc:

Why are the Game Of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny?

The Daenerys Targaryen who falls in love with a man who granted her respect when no one else would is different from the Daenerys Targaryen who fell in love with her rapist.

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ROLLING EYES AT SELF

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swingsetindecember:

samsamtastic:

I get the musicgeek newsletter and the guy in charge is named Derek and every time the newest email hits my inbox I think of a bearded Derek Hale in soft flannel shirts and six year old jeans sitting in his rolling chair at his desk, carefully curating each and every pairing of song and gif. 

Discuss

derek would wear these really soft henleys and cardigans. he’d steep his tea while listening to the black keys and have a pair of thick thermal socks to keep the chill from his feet as they tap out the baseline. his beard is coming alone nicely since he abhors shaving in the morning since he’s barely awake without at least two cups of tea. 

he keeps getting e-mails from this guy named stiles criticizing his music tastes. and derek is just like really into music so he writes these really long e-mails back and maybe he made the guy an 8 track to listen to. and no, that’s not a mixed tape. it’s not like he likes this stiles guy. he’s probably just some douchey hipster who doesn’t even like star wars. at least that’s what derek tells himself but really his e-mails with stiles are the highlight of his work week.

stiles mentions an alternative music festival in san diego and derek was actually going for his newsletter and stiles actually sends him his cellphone number because he’s going to with a couple of friends from college. and suddenly derek is anxious because he’s pretty quiet and reserved in person rather than in his e-mails where he uses capslocks and rants about autotuning ruining music. so he’s worried that stiles won’t want to meet derek, because he wears old cardigans and hasn’t made new friends since grad school. 

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(Source: fucklinski)

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